Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

District Office Leadership Practices' Impact on Principal Job Satisfaction
by Curcio, Lea, Ed.D., University of La Verne, 2018, 163; 10810177
Abstract (Summary)

Problem. The demands of the principalship have become overwhelming for school principals and have contributed to job dissatisfaction. The expectations and pressure for schools to demonstrate positive learning outcomes require principals to be highly skilled and motivated. Since principal performance is directly affected by their job satisfaction, district offices would benefit from understanding how district directors’ leadership practices influence the job satisfaction of principals and which supports are the most impactful.

Purpose. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore how district directors’ leadership behaviors, as aligned to Kouzes and Posner’s (2012) 5 practices of exemplary leadership, influence principals’ job satisfaction from the perspective of principals from small to midsized San Diego County school districts in kindergarten through 8th-grade Southern California schools.

Methodology. This qualitative single case study focused on a semistructured interview and a public district document review to explore from the principal’s perspective district office directors’ leadership behaviors and practices that influence principal job satisfaction and identify impactful supports.

Findings. The analysis of the findings resulted in 6 themes and 14 subthemes that described, from principals’ perspectives, leadership behaviors and practices of district office directors that align with Kouzes and Posner’s 5 practices of exemplary and what support provided positively influenced principal job satisfaction.

Conclusions. When district office directors lead in a manner that is responsive, supportive, and encouraging, it fosters positive relationships and higher levels of job satisfaction among site principals. By improving working conditions of site principals, district leaders are minimizing principal turnover and increasing principals’ effectiveness.

Recommendations. District directors should be available and responsive to principal needs engaging in collaboration and problem solving. They should create an environment that allows for frequent communication and input, and provide personalized coaching for principals on topics of their choice. Districts should create systems that formalize these supports.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Liu, Lu
Commitee: Barnes, Gregory, Singh, Candace
School: University of La Verne
Department: LaFetra College of Education
School Location: United States -- California
Source: DAI-A 79/11(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational evaluation, Educational leadership, Education
Keywords: District leadership, Factors in principal satisfaction, Principal job satisfaction, School district office, School leadership
Publication Number: 10810177
ISBN: 978-0-438-12258-1
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