Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Principals' Perceptions of Arts Education in Public Elementary Schools in Southeastern Virginia
by Ellis, Dionne Lichelle, Ph.D., Hampton University, 2018, 218; 10829009
Abstract (Summary)

The purpose of this qualitative constructivist grounded theory study was to explore principals’ practices in determining the extent of student access to arts education in an elementary school setting. As an integral component for student and job growth in the 21st century, the study of arts education promotes innovation and creativity. Research questions include: (1) What are the elementary principal’s role and responsibilities regarding arts education in elementary public schools?, (2) To what extent do elementary principals perceive arts education influences scholastic achievement?, (3) How would elementary principals describe what a successful arts education program?, and (4) How can elementary principals facilitate arts integration through curriculum alignment, instruction, and assessments in 21st century learning? Findings identified accessibility, engagement, and stakeholder collaboration as critical components for sustainable arts programs. Recommendations for future research include, but not limited to, a mixed methods study to analyze teachers’ perceptions of arts integration and math score assessment.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Johnson, Stephanie D.B.
Commitee: Berube, Clair, Clark, Reuthenia, Stokes, Harvey
School: Hampton University
Department: Education
School Location: United States -- Virginia
Source: DAI-A 79/10(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Arts Management, Educational leadership, Performing arts education, Educational administration, Elementary education
Keywords: Arts Education, Constructivist Grounded Theory, Educational Connoisseurship and Criticism Theory, Principals' Perceptions, STEAM, The Mozart Effect
Publication Number: 10829009
ISBN: 9780438082533
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