Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The Relationship between Note-Taking Method and Grade Point Average When Controlling for ACT Score and Self-Regulation Ability in Undergraduate Students
by Gurley, Donna L., Ph.D., The University of Mississippi, 2018, 165; 10747687
Abstract (Summary)

A sample of 130 students from a mid-sized research university in the southern United States were asked questions about their note-taking practices, particularly about the percentage of classes in which they had taken notes on a laptop for both the previous semester and for their entire undergraduate career. Note-taking method was then entered as an independent variable along with composite ACT score and each students' score on the Self Regulation Survey (SRS) (Schwarzer, Diehl, & Schmitz, 1999) into a multiple regression analysis to determine the extent to which there is a relationship between note-taking method and grade point average. No significant relationship was found between note-taking method and grade point average for either the fall 2016 semester or for students' overall grade point average. While there is a relationship between composite ACT score and grade point average, no relationship was found between students' scores on the Self Regulation Survey and grade point average. Although not a focus of the study, the researcher did find a significant relationship between composite ACT score and note taking method. This relationship merits additional research.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Melear, Kerry B.
Commitee: Holleman, John, Kellum, Kate, Wells-Dolan, Amy
School: The University of Mississippi
Department: Higher Education
School Location: United States -- Mississippi
Source: DAI-A 79/10(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational tests & measurements, Higher education
Keywords: Computers, Grade point average, Handwriting, Higher education, Laptops, Note taking
Publication Number: 10747687
ISBN: 978-0-438-06672-4
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