Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The Influence of Anticipation, Anxiety, and Avoidance on the Stuttering Experience
by Jumper, Andrea, M.A., Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, 2018, 35; 10793971
Abstract (Summary)

Stuttering is a speech disorder recognized in both speech pathology and psychology diagnostic manuals. Overt characteristics of the disorder include prolonged and disrupted speech while covert behaviors include anxiety and avoidance (American Speech-Language Hearing Association, n.d; American Psychiatric Association, 2013). The purpose of this study was to highlight the significant role covert characteristics play in the stuttering experience. Specifically, this study investigated anticipation, avoidance, anxiety, life interference, and self-reported stuttering severity. The data used for this study was archival data collected from 2012–2013 to investigate psychological traits within the stuttering population. The participants were adults who stuttered recruited from online and in-vivo stuttering support groups. Analysis of the data found 1) no significant difference in avoidant behavior between those who do and do not anticipate stuttering events 2) that anxiety and avoidance are positively correlated regardless of ability to anticipate, and 3) that anxiety and avoidance are greater predictors of life interference than self-reported stuttering severity. These finding provide further evidence of the impact of psychosocial traits on the stuttering experience and support the need for comprehensive stuttering interventions.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Pawlow, Laura
Commitee: Pomerantz, Andrew, Segrist, Dan
School: Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville
Department: Clinical Psychology
School Location: United States -- Illinois
Source: MAI 57/06M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Speech therapy, Clinical psychology
Keywords: Anticipation, Anxiety, Avoidance, Fluency, Life interference, Stuttering
Publication Number: 10793971
ISBN: 9780438018396
Copyright © 2019 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest