Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Adult Learners' Experience with Immediate Intervention in a Self-Regulated Learning Environment
by Soydan, Deniz, D.Ed., Capella University, 2018, 168; 10824712
Abstract (Summary)

Technological developments in the workplace in the United States have led to a demand for highly skilled laborers in the workforce. Hence, adult students return to college to earn four-year college degrees or obtain certifications in order to meet the demand for highly skilled positions. Thus, colleges and universities must find learning models that best meet the needs of adults. The problem addressed in this research study focuses on adult learners’ experiences and whether or not technology paired with immediate intervention services in the developmental English language courses meets their needs by improving their learning outcomes. Hence, adult participants were asked in face-to-face interviews what experiences best served them. A random, purposeful, and heterogeneous sample of first-year adult learners, exclusively ranging from 25 to 60 years of age, was recruited. A basic qualitative research methodology was used in this study, which involved semistructured interviews with the adult participants, the open and axial coding of the responses of the participants, and the interpretation of the coded responses. Themes then began to emerge from the coded data collected from the interviews. The interpretation of the coding revealed that the adult participants in the study testified that the computerized program was user friendly, helped them develop computer skills, and was a superior learning tool. They also testified that the immediate intervention and personal attention of the instructor and computer lab staff assisted them as adult learners with their concentration, encouraged them to attend four year colleges, provided them with in-service training, and helped them in the development of their careers. Briefly, the findings show that students appreciated computer-learning programs because they could develop computer skills and also acquire basic skills by accessing hypermedia/multimedia and game stimulation on computers, which they found user-friendly. It was clear that students felt that they made significant progress in their English development because they had support services readily available to them. Further, since they were independent adult learners, it was evident that they preferred to self-pace and self-regulate their learning. It is hopeful that the examination of the findings of the study will generate new strategies for improving students’ learning experiences.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Misite, Phyllis
Commitee: Garrity, Collete, Wilcox, Bonita
School: Capella University
Department: Education
School Location: United States -- Minnesota
Source: DAI-A 79/10(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Higher Education Administration, Adult education, Educational technology
Keywords: Adult learner, Adult learning experience, Computer-based environments, Immediate intervention, Learning in virtual environment, Self-regulated learning
Publication Number: 10824712
ISBN: 9780438015951
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