Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Anxiety and Depression: Temporal Manifestations of the Same Disorder?
by Lupardus, Joshua, M.A., Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, 2018, 59; 10807938
Abstract (Summary)

Anxiety and depression are some of the most common forms of mental illness. About 66 percent of the population diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder will also be diagnosed with a form of depression in their lifetimes (Kaufman & Charney, 2000). While historically anxiety and depression have been seen as inherently separate conditions, recent research has indicated that the two disorders may be more closely linked. Watson and Clark’s (1991) tripartite model explains that the comorbidity rates of the disorders and overlapping symptomology could be due to an underlying, shared factor that they called negative affect. Eysenck, Payne, and Santos (2006) found evidence to suggest that anxiety and depression may be temporal manifestations of the same disorder which they called negative affect in reference to the tripartite model. Two other studies have since found evidence for this temporal differentiation (Pomerantz & Rose, 2014; Rinaldi, Locati, Parolin, & Girelli, 2017). Results of this study indicate that there is evidence to suggest a temporal component as a potential associated factor which could help determine whether anxiety or depression manifests in individuals with high levels of negative affect.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Pomerantz, Andrew
Commitee: Ro, Eunyoe, Segrist, Dan
School: Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville
Department: Clinical Psychology
School Location: United States -- Illinois
Source: MAI 57/06M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Psychology, Clinical psychology
Keywords: Anxiety, Depression, Temporal orientation
Publication Number: 10807938
ISBN: 9780438015067
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