Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Determining Perceived Barriers Affecting Physicians' Readiness to Disclose Major Medical Errors
by Folligah, Jean-Pierre K., Ph.D., Walden University, 2018, 126; 10811358
Abstract (Summary)

Medical errors have been detrimental in the field of medicine. They have impacted both patients and doctors. While physicians recognized that error disclosure was an ethical and professional obligation, most remained silent when mistakes happened for different reasons. Guided by the theory of planned behavior and Kant's deontological theory, the purpose of this quantitative study was to investigate the perceived barriers affecting physicians' willingness to report major medical errors. An association was tested between the independent variables physician fear of disclosure of errors, organizational culture toward patient safety, physician apology, professional ethics and transparency, physician education, and the dependent variable physician willingness to disclose major medical errors. Using a cross-sectional method, 122 doctors out of 483 surveyed, completed the online and paper-based survey. Multiple linear regression and descriptive statistics models were used to analyze and summarize the data. The results showed there was a statistically significant relationship between the independent variables organizational culture toward patient safety, physician apology, professional ethics and transparency, and physician education and the dependent variable physician willingness to disclose major medical errors. There was no relationship between the independent variable fear of disclosure of errors and the dependent variable. The findings added to the knowledge base regarding barriers to physicians' medical errors disclosure. The results and recommendations could provide positive social change by helping hospitals raising doctors' awareness regarding major medical errors disclosure.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Newell, Cynthia
Commitee: Bewley, Lee, Nkansah-Amankra, Stephen
School: Walden University
Department: Health Services
School Location: United States -- Minnesota
Source: DAI-B 79/09(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Health sciences, Health care management
Keywords: Culture of safety, Kant's deontological theory, Medical errors, Patient safety, Physician readiness, Theory of planned behavior
Publication Number: 10811358
ISBN: 9780355882582
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