Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Perceptions of Tunisian Educators of the effects of the Arab Spring on Tunisia's Educational Policies and Reforms Related to Corruption, Job Preparation, and English Language: A Mixed Methods Study
by Mokhtari, Abdelmadjid, D.E., University of Louisiana at Lafayette, 2018, 179; 10743312
Abstract (Summary)

The Arab Spring marked a milestone in the political, social, and economic struggle of the Arab populations. Tunisian youth, like the rest of the Middle Eastern and North African (MENA) youth, dream of a corruption-free Tunisia, better and stronger educational system, and a fair access to suitable employment opportunities in a rapidly evolving and competitive world where students who are well-prepared academically and master the English language have a clear advantage to land good jobs and enjoy a brighter professional and social future compared to those who lack adequate professional skills and mastery of English language. This study specifically focused on examining the perceptions of Tunisian K–12 and university educators (i.e., teachers and educational leaders) of the effects of the Arab Spring on Tunisia’s educational policies and reforms related to corruption, job preparation, and English language. Historically, Tunisia’s 1956–2010 official educational policy has addressed important issues but not the corruption or job preparation issue. Only the mid-1990’s reform addressed the English language teaching in Tunisian schools. Furthermore, the researcher used the convergent parallel design strategy to answer this study’s empirical research questions (i.e., 2nd and 3rd). Results indicated that 51.9% of Tunisian educators (n = 52) believe that the Arab Spring has set the environment to develop educational policies and reforms related to corruption, 50 % believe that the Arab Spring has set the environment to develop educational policies and reforms related to job preparation, but less than a third (28.8%) believe that the Arab Spring has set the environment to develop educational policies and reforms related to English language. Furthermore, the majority of participants do not believe that Tunisia’s post-Arab Spring educational policies and reforms related to corruption (80.7%), job preparation (76.9%), and English language (65.4%) were effective. Additionally, 96.2% of the participants are convinced that post-Arab Spring Tunisia urgently needs new and effective educational policies and reforms to mitigate corruption, close the education-job market gap, and improve and increase English language teaching in Tunisian schools. There was no discrepancy between statistical and qualitative results in the study.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Slater, Robert O.
Commitee: Campbell, Kathleen, Cilesiz, Sebnem
School: University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Department: Educational Leadership
School Location: United States -- Louisiana
Source: DAI-A 79/09(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational leadership
Keywords: Arab spring, Arab world (MENA), Tunisia, Tunisian k-12 educators, Tunisian university educators, Tunisia’s educational policy and reforms
Publication Number: 10743312
ISBN: 9780355854619
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