Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

"Scolares pacem cum civibus imperpetuum non haberent ": Conflict and the Formation of the University Communities in Paris, Orléans, and Toulouse, 1200–1389
by Khalifian, Shahrouz, M.A., California State University, Long Beach, 2018, 127; 10751221
Abstract (Summary)

This thesis explores the role of town-and-gown violence as a constructive force during the rise of three universities in medieval France: the university in Paris in the thirteenth century and the universities in Orléans and Toulouse in the fourteenth century. These universities became established fixtures in the social and political spaces of their respective cities partly as a result of violence between scholars and townspeople and the protracted arbitration and litigation that succeeded a violent incident. More specifically, various instances of town-and-gown violence created the circumstances through which the scholars and the townspeople in each city could negotiate new terms of coexistence, often through royal and papal mediation. In Paris, Orléans, and Toulouse, the involvement of the French monarchy in these conflicts became one of the major points of contention. Violence and conflict served as mechanisms by which the scholars and the townspeople sought to debate the way royal power was weighted. In each city, violent encounters and subsequent resolutions of conflict allowed the scholars to establish themselves as members of an enduring structure, defining their roles within the social and political networks of the city.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Kelleher, Marie
Commitee: Shafer, David, İğmen, Ali
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: History
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 57/05M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: European history, Education history, Medieval history
Keywords: France, Medieval university, Orléans, Paris, Scholars, Toulouse
Publication Number: 10751221
ISBN: 9780355858464
Copyright © 2019 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest