Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Nutritional Knowledge, Behaviors, and Perceptions among Jews in the United States
by Rimmon, Dahlia, M.S., California State University, Long Beach, 2018, 77; 10748317
Abstract (Summary)

There is a lack of research regarding nutrition knowledge, behaviors, and perceptions among Jews in the United States. This knowledge gap may contribute to nutritional or other health-related problems in this cohort. The purpose of this study was to investigate knowledge, behavior, and perceptions of nutrition among Jewish men and women in the United States using a mixed methods approach. Quantitative analysis demonstrated relationships between nutrition knowledge and religious affiliation (Orthodox, Conservative, and Reform), average frequency intake of protein by religious affiliation, and average frequency intake of protein by kosher status. Qualitative interview themes revealed the cultural and ritual aspects of Judaism influence on food choices and behaviors, the multitude of factors that influence food choice such as peer pressure, preconceived notions of food, and the healthiness of food, and further enlightened how the media negatively portrays body image for both Jewish men and women.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Reiboldt, Wendy
Commitee: Devine, Wendy, Moore, Dustin
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: Family and Consumer Sciences
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 57/05M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Nutrition, Judaic studies
Keywords: Jews, Judaism, Mixed methods, Nutrition, Qualitative, Quantitative
Publication Number: 10748317
ISBN: 9780355841510
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