Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Mechanical Properties of Semiconducting Polymers
by Root, Samuel E., Ph.D., University of California, San Diego, 2018, 307; 10745535
Abstract (Summary)

Mechanical softness and deformability underpin most of the advantages offered by semiconducting polymers. A detailed understanding of the mechanical properties of these materials is crucial for the design and manufacturing of robust, thin-film devices such as solar cells, displays, and sensors. The mechanical behavior of polymers is a complex function of many interrelated factors that span multiple scales, ranging from molecular structure, to microstructural morphology, and device geometry. This thesis builds a comprehensive understanding of the thermomechanical properties of polymeric semiconductors through the development and experimental-validation of computational methods for mechanical simulation. A predictive computational methodology is designed and encapsulated into open-sourced software for automating molecular dynamics simulations on modern supercomputing hardware. These simulations are used to explore the role of molecular structure/weight and processing conditions on solid-state morphology and thermomechanical behavior. Experimental characterization is employed to test these predictions—including the development of simple, new techniques for rigorously characterizing thermal transitions and fracture mechanics of thin films.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Lipomi, Darren J.
Commitee: Gilson, Michael K., Meng, Ying Shirley, Ng, Tse Nga, Ong, Shyue Ping
School: University of California, San Diego
Department: Chemical Engineering
School Location: United States -- California
Source: DAI-B 79/08(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Chemical engineering, Molecular physics, Materials science
Keywords: Mechanical properties, Molecular dynamics, Organic electronics, Semiconducting polymers, Stretchable electronics, Thin films
Publication Number: 10745535
ISBN: 9780355827019
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