Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Homecoming in Liminal Times: Depth Psychological Perspectives on the Experience of Immigration
by Thalji, Nadia Khalil, Ph.D., Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2018, 215; 10785558
Abstract (Summary)

The purpose of this inquiry was to develop a depth psychological understanding of immigration as a liminal experience. The Free Association Narrative Interview (FANI) method derived meaning from the lived experiences of five recent immigrants from both Western and Eastern cultures. Emergent themes referenced the expanded understanding of immigration as a process of homecoming, perceived psychoanalytically as a transitional phenomenon; in Jungian terms, a transcendent one. Homecoming represented both a process of transformation and an area of experiencing as the individual came to terms with the liminal experience of immigration by integrating self-experience and bridging differences and similarities. Results offered a new view of a depth psychological approach to the phenomenon of immigration, suggesting an association between trauma and the loss of a sense of home, and the function of symbolization in the process of bridging differences and similarities, enabling psychic growth. Clinical implications included understanding the nature of the sense of loss of home, developing coping strategies for immigrants who see themselves as being in between worlds or homeless, and integrating immigrant clients into the new culture. Future research emphasized methodological considerations.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Panajian, Avedis
Commitee: McGinty, Wendy, Shore, Barbara
School: Pacifica Graduate Institute
Department: Clinical Psychology
School Location: United States -- California
Source: DAI-B 79/08(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Cultural anthropology, Social psychology
Keywords: Depth psychology, Immigration, Liminality, Transcendent function, Transitional phenomena
Publication Number: 10785558
ISBN: 978-0-355-82276-2
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