Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Effects of Early Childhood Education on Reading Preparedness in Third Grade of Elementary School
by Williams, Kimberly A., Ed.D., Lindenwood University, 2017, 160; 10751768
Abstract (Summary)

Reading has been found to not only build student motivation but to increase community involvement in education (Hudson & Williams, 2015). Children who grow into lifelong readers were less likely to be incarcerated, became more successful members of society, and created greater futures for themselves and their families (Obama, 2013). With exposure to early childhood education opportunities, children found a greater propensity to attain foundational reading skills; therefore, positive habits for education lead to thriving outcomes in the future (DeHaan & Leuven, 2016). This study analyzed variations in preschool programs in order to detect curricular, facility, and instructor distinctions (DeHaan & Leuven, 2016). Educators, parents, and community members were predominantly favorable of financing and supporting early childhood education (DeHaan & Leuven, 2016). Globally, early childhood education is continually trying to maintain a more prevalent stature in society (DeHaan & Leuven, 2016). Early childhood education can seemingly take an indirect step backwards in school districts due to to other educational necessities (DeHaan & Leuven, 2016). In this study, the researcher analyzed early childhood education opportunities and the impact on students’ reading comprehension in third grade.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Elder, Jodi E.
Commitee: Caffey, Randy, Johnson, Merlyn
School: Lindenwood University
Department: Education
School Location: United States -- Missouri
Source: DAI-A 79/08(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Early childhood education, Elementary education, Reading instruction
Keywords: Foundational reading skills, Reading comprehension
Publication Number: 10751768
ISBN: 978-0-355-80185-9
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