Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Redesigning High School through a Personalized Learning Model
by Metcalf, Shelia Elaine, Ed.D., William Woods University, 2017, 167; 10742972
Abstract (Summary)

Personalized learning is an evolving method for tailoring the goals of K-12 education to meet the needs of each student. This study supports education leaders in learning how to tailor education plans that maximize success for each student. This study extends learning about a better course of action for schools that might prevent students from being in credit lag and at risk of dropping out. This qualitative research study aims to outline themes about time, place and pace in earning high school credits, as well as combat the reasons why students drop out. Through a qualitative content analysis of US Department of Education reports, corporate advocacy narratives, and published research monographs, the researcher examined how rationales for a personalized learning model served to further innovative approaches to high school course completion by redefining the roles of teacher and student in the learning environment. The theory of situated learning was the basis for recognizing the relationships between teaching and learning in a personalized learning instructional model. The documents showed a high level of density in discussing the combined roles of teacher and student with little regard for the singular role of teacher in a personalized learning model.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Ferhat, Caroline E. Boyer
Commitee: Hanrahan, Timothy, Trogdon, Leslie, Westerfield, Michael
School: William Woods University
Department: Education
School Location: United States -- Missouri
Source: DAI-A 79/08(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational leadership, Educational administration, Secondary education
Keywords: Competency-based, Dropout, Graduation, High school, Personalized, Redesign
Publication Number: 10742972
ISBN: 9780355768503
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