Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Improving the Usability of Typometric Solutions
by Singh, Akash, M.S., California State University, Long Beach, 2017, 110; 10638610
Abstract (Summary)

Digital media have made it possible for people with disabilities to have better access to information and mainstream publications. New and improved guidelines by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) have helped millions of users with various types of disabilities to utilize the web to its full potential. The Web Content Accessibility Guideline (WCAG) 2.0 has pushed for several reforms to ensure that web pages are equally accessible for people with disabilities. How- ever, there are some limitations with the WCAG 2.0 when it comes to accommodating people with Low Vision. The W3C agrees and is currently working to draft a new set of guidelines that will address this specific problem. In the push to accommodate people with low vision, a team at California State University Long Beach, led by Dr. Wayne E Dick, proposed a software so- lution called Typometric Prescriptions or TRx which generates a user based custom stylesheet. The purpose of this thesis was to build on top of the working framework of TRx and shape it to be a completely functional stylesheet generator for people with low vision. The research and technical work put into this study have led to the development of a keyboard accessible color picker that makes it possible to pick a color from the possible 16 million choices, with less than 48 keystrokes.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Monge, Alvaro
Commitee: Dick, Wayne E., Vu, Kim-Phuong L.
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: Computer Engineering and Computer Science
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 57/05M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Web Studies, Computer science
Keywords: Assistive technology, Custom stylesheets, Html css, Low vision, Typometric solutions, Web accessibility
Publication Number: 10638610
ISBN: 9780355562903
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