Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Ethnic Identity and Empathy: A Study of Second-Generation Armenian-Americans
by Bedikian, Alique, Psy.D., The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, 2018, 101; 10745067
Abstract (Summary)

Ethnic identity provides both affective and rational sense of belonging to a cultural group. In 1915, the Armenian race survived an attempted ethnic cleansing by the Ottoman Turks, which has an impact on the way Armenians conceptualize themselves ethnically today. Past research has failed to consider the role of affective empathy in ethnic identity. This study sought to explore the relationship between ethnic identity and empathy in second-generation Armenian-Americans. A convenience sample of fifty Armenian-American adults born in the United States participated in the study. Quantitative measures and qualitative, open-ended questions were utilized to gather data. Phinney’s (1992) Multi Ethnic Identity Measure (MEIM) was utilized to assess ethnic identity, and Spreng’s (2009) Toronto Empathy Questionnaire (TEQ) was utilized to measure empathy. Statistical analyses comparing the relationship between levels of ethnic identity and empathy did not yield significant results. Content analysis of qualitative data revealed themes of Armenian ethnic identity providing feelings of strength and pride, as well as it being a rational concept rather than affective. Additionally, themes revealed a desire to assimilate to the host country.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Webster, Terry, Schultz, Donald
Commitee:
School: The Chicago School of Professional Psychology
Department: Applied Clinical Psychology
School Location: United States -- Illinois
Source: DAI-B 79/07(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Psychology, Ethnic studies
Keywords: Acculturation, Armenian American, Armenian genocide, Empathy, Ethnic identity, Second generation
Publication Number: 10745067
ISBN: 9780355651720
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