Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

A New World Order: The Trials and Tribulations of American Primacy
by Jones, John D.W., M.A.L.S., Georgetown University, 2017, 83; 10643418
Abstract (Summary)

Over the past twenty-five years, the United States has moved from optimism to considerable pessimism about its role to do well in the world. Indeed, President George H.W. Bush’s “New World Order” stands unquestionably in stark contrast to today’s reality; from failed states in Africa to aspiring if not un-stabilizing states in Asia. Yet, when faced with such problems the United States does not know what it stands for, or what to do about them. In short, since emerging as a superpower the United States has, until of late, known what role it must play in terms of global leadership; whether it was making the world safer for democracy or in charge of a global economic order. Nevertheless, since the collapse of the Soviet Union, the American led geo-political system, as a whole, has become more unstable not less.

Using a multidimensional approach this thesis sets out a trio of structural factors: (1) Superpower China; (2) A liberal international order that is neither liberal, nor international, nor orderly; (3) Failed American foreign policy. Combined, these three factors have emerged to mean that American primacy is in real danger. This thesis also proposes that for Pax Americana to continue there must emerge a consistency between American values and the grand strategy that it pursues.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Kerch, Thomas M.
Commitee:
School: Georgetown University
Department: Liberal Studies
School Location: United States -- District of Columbia
Source: MAI 57/04M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: International Relations, Political science, Public policy
Keywords: American foreign policy, Chinese foreign policy, Globalization, Grand strategy, Military intervention, Statecraft
Publication Number: 10643418
ISBN: 9780355626438
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