Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Stigma Experience among Chinese American Immigrants with Schizophrenia
by Lai, Grace Ying Chi, Ph.D., New York University, 2018, 144; 10688783
Abstract (Summary)

Stigma has profound consequences on individuals with mental illness, specifically schizophrenia. Individuals who suffer from internalized stigma further struggle with self-esteem, quality of life, and their recovery from mental illness. To avoid rejection and being the target of discrimination, these individuals often practice coping strategies such as secrecy and withdrawal. However, these coping strategies can eventually lead to poor self-image, restricted opportunities in life, and other negative outcomes. Cultural beliefs relating to the concept of face and Confucianism further exacerbate the effects of stigma among Chinese American individuals who suffer from mental illnesses.

This study examined the experiences of stigma and coping strategies used by Chinese Americans with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. The associations between internalized stigma, experienced stigma, loss of face, and coping strategies were also analyzed. Unlike previous studies, this study found that internalized and experienced stigma were not associated with coping strategies used by the Chinese American participants; instead, the cultural construct of loss of face was associated with secrecy as a coping strategy. This study calls for further research on the effects of this cultural construct on one’s recovery.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Shibusawa, Tazuko
Commitee: Padgett, Deborah, Stanhope, Victoria, Yang, Lawrence
School: New York University
Department: Social Work
School Location: United States -- New York
Source: DAI-A 79/04(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Asian American Studies, Mental health, Social work
Keywords: Asian, Chinese American, Mental health, Mental illnes, Social work, Stigma
Publication Number: 10688783
ISBN: 9780355544459
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