Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Association Between Hand Hygiene and Hospital Acquired Infections (HAI): A Phenomenological Study at a Southeastern State Hospital
by Fan, Gainson, D.P.H., Capella University, 2017, 82; 10680587
Abstract (Summary)

Greater awareness regarding healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) has drawn in a great deal of attention from the government at the local, state, and federal level as well as from the general public and medical insurance companies such as Medicaid and Medicare. This level of attention is the product of heightened interest in the quality of healthcare and the realization that most HAIs can be averted. Healthcare organizations and medical providers worldwide continue to observe exceptional developments in the comprehension of the physiology of uncommon or disease-causing agents and increased transmission of multidrug-resistant organisms in healthcare facilities both nationally and internationally. Such circumstances have prompted the re-examination of fundamental infection prevention processes in healthcare facilities. Evidence-based research has linked hand hygiene compliance to decreased nosocomial infections. With the World Health Organization (WHO) leadership and guidelines on hand hygiene in healthcare and patient safety initiatives, healthcare facilities must focus on compliance in hand hygiene practices. It is inexpensive, simple and it can save many lives.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Alonge, Heather
Commitee: Benton, Stacy, Hughes, Seyra
School: Capella University
Department: Nursing and Health Sciences
School Location: United States -- Minnesota
Source: DAI-B 79/03(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Public health, Epidemiology
Keywords: Effects of hand hygiene on infections, Hai, Hand hygiene, Hospital acquired infections, Hospital infections, Infections in cancer patients
Publication Number: 10680587
ISBN: 9780355522884
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