Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Healthy Attachment and Parent-Child Relationships
by Shafie, Robert, Ph.D., Grand Canyon University, 2017, 281; 10687191
Abstract (Summary)

Relations between parents and children play an essential role across the life course. A vast number of studies provide empirical evidence for the link between parental attachment and the psychological well-being of children. The purpose of this descriptive qualitative study was to explore how American and American Lebanese parents perceive the influence of parent-child relationships on their children’s well-being. Bowlby’s attachment theory provided the theoretical framework for the study. A qualitative descriptive design was used in which 100 parents were sampled to complete a mostly open-ended online questionnaire. Additionally, 12 parent participants were interviewed by phone. Questionnaire results were presented in percentages and summary format. Interview results were deductively summarized. Main codes for the first research question were parent/child bonding, reciprocal communication patterns and connectedness. Main codes for the second research question included barriers to parent/child relationships and changes that occurred in the relationship over time. Findings did not reveal culture significantly influenced parent/child relationships in this sample. In conclusion, the study identified that closeness and communication are related to family the parent/child relationship. Due to limited analysis strategy and limited variation in the sample, more research is recommended.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Halfhill, Terry, Esmail, Ashraf
Commitee: Brown, Daniel
School: Grand Canyon University
Department: Doctoral Studies
School Location: United States -- Arizona
Source: DAI-B 79/03(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Social psychology, Psychology, Individual & family studies
Keywords: Healthy attachment, Parent-child relationships
Publication Number: 10687191
ISBN: 978-0-355-52660-8
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