Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Music Integration Therapy: An Instructional Tool for Students with Special Needs
by Rodriguez, Delilah, D.Ed., Capella University, 2017, 108; 10640904
Abstract (Summary)

Students with special needs are required by law to have an individualized education plan based on their unique educational needs. Special education teachers understand these needs and provide students with instructional strategies that allow them to succeed. Music has often been used to provide students with disabilities alternative ways to learn new content; however, the use of music integration therapy in the special education setting as well as its impact on the engagement behaviors on students with special needs is not widely documented in current educational research. A collective case study was used to explore how special education teachers use music integration therapy as an instructional tool for students with special needs. Four special education teachers in a large school district in a western state who have used music therapy in their interactions with students with special needs participated in the study. Each had different motivations for their use of music therapy in the classroom. The data gathered from interviews and observations revealed that each educator viewed progress for students on an individualized basis. The implications of the results of the study and their relationship to the literature are discussed. In addition, recommendations for future research are presented.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Larson, Mark
Commitee: Klimoski, Victor, Rossman, Mark H.
School: Capella University
Department: Education
School Location: United States -- Minnesota
Source: DAI-A 79/03(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Music therapy, Special education, Curriculum development
Keywords: Curriculum practices, Instructional strategies, Instructional tools, Music therapy, Student progress
Publication Number: 10640904
ISBN: 978-0-355-47086-4
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