Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Increasing College Access: A Look at College Readiness from the Experiences of Foster Youth
by Hutchins, Demetrees Lee, Ph.D., Indiana University, 2017, 159; 10636304
Abstract (Summary)

Fewer than 50% of all foster youth in the United States graduate from high school by the age of 18 and only 20% of those high school graduates attend college. There are many barriers that impact the college-going rates of foster youth. Past studies on college attendance among foster youth rarely look at college readiness experiences from the perspective of the student and have a tendency to focus foster youth as a homogeneous population of low-income underserved and underrepresented students. Consequently, these studies offer little to no insight on what leads to successful college enrollment among foster youth. A phenomenological approach was used to allow participants to share their college readiness experiences from their perspective. This qualitative study investigated the college readiness experiences of foster youth who successfully graduated from high school and experiences that led to college enrollment. Understanding barriers to college attendance foster youth faced from their perspective provided a deeper understanding of their college readiness experiences and what it took to get to college. Using in-depth interviews and focus groups, this study explored and discussed perceived barriers and college readiness experiences participants encountered on their journey to college.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Hughes, Robin L., Pike, Gary R.
Commitee: Murtadha, Khaula H., Rogan, Patricia, Stanfield, John, Thompson, Chalmer
School: Indiana University
Department: Education
School Location: United States -- Indiana
Source: DAI-A 79/02(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Higher education
Keywords: Child welfare, Low-income students
Publication Number: 10636304
ISBN: 9780355432961
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