Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

How Reflection Leads to Unlocking the Gifts of the African American and English Learner Student
by Mozer, Bonnie, Ed.D., Mills College, 2014, 118; 10635340
Abstract (Summary)

This research project offers educators a close and intimate view of the researcher's personal teaching efforts and a reflective account of responses to instruction. This qualitative reflective self-study includes written records of attempts to create and deliver reading comprehension lessons. It also includes a detailed account of how the researcher's reflections and insights affected lesson design as well as her responses to the academic, social, and emotional needs of the students. Furthermore, this self-study examines how teachers' and administrators' attitudes impact teaching and learning, with a thoughtful emphasis on how the gifts of under-represented students may be used in effectively planning instruction. Specifically, this self-study presents how reflection is used to examine the application of various teaching strategies with eight elementary school students attending a reading comprehension intervention class at an urban school in California. The researcher chronicles her use of culturally relevant teaching practices grounded in high expectations, and a belief in the importance of student empowerment for the purpose of increasing social justice and equity for all students. In this study, reflective notes of lessons are presented. Additionally, how the lessons were designed in order to create opportunities for a small group of African American and English Language Learner students to use their talents and gifts to improve comprehension of text are detailed. This teacher-research study provides insights on how a cycle of deep reflection and consideration of planned instructional actions and design might be improved. As part of the reflection and instructional planning process described in this study, there is focus on the students' thinking and learning processes and domains that support the students as they become self-empowered, independent, and confident readers. The examination of the thinking process of the students, as well reflection and self-examination of instruction by the teacher-researcher, are the center of study. Ultimately, a vivid story unfolds of how both the students and teacher-researcher become more empowered as gifted readers, writers, and communicators of transformation.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Donahue, Dave
Commitee: Ketelle, Diane
School: Mills College
Department: Education - Educational Leadership
School Location: United States -- California
Source: DAI-A 79/02(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Education, Early childhood education, Reading instruction
Keywords: African american, Culturally relevant pedagogy, English language learners, Reading comprehension, Teacher reflective self-study, Urban elementary education
Publication Number: 10635340
ISBN: 9780355358629
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