Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Applying Military Developments in Netcentricity to Civilian Emergency Management
by McCollough, Kevin D., M.S., California State University, Long Beach, 2017, 86; 10289142
Abstract (Summary)

The co-evolution of the operational art and technology in the military arena may have applications for emergency management operations. The application of network-based systems towards disaster management and public safety has the potential to capitalize on lessons learned from the military to improve command and control, speed of communication and operational agility. In order to react to a constantly evolving operational picture while maintaining forces spread across great distances, the military has developed network-based organizations and command and control structures to capitalize on advances in technology. These techniques and the understanding and development of local networks could have a similar impact on domestic disaster relief. In today’s asymmetric operational environment, commanders have the ability and doctrine to develop the situation remotely, process raw data into actionable intelligence and push direction and guidance down to operating forces at a rapid rate. The size and scope of disasters affecting the populace today require a more agile and networked organizational structure. This research will explore whether the same netcentric techniques and practices used by the military can be used in domestic disaster response.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Feldmann-Jensen, Shirley
Commitee: Bethany, Michael, Jensen, Steven, Kreysa, Peter
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: Criminology, Criminal Justice and Emergency Management
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 57/01M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Criminology
Keywords: Civilian, Emergency, Emergency management, Management, Military, Netcentric, Netcentricity
Publication Number: 10289142
ISBN: 9780355398014
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