Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Modeling the Mitral Valve
by Kaiser, Alexander D., Ph.D., New York University, 2017, 212; 10618342
Abstract (Summary)

This thesis is concerned with modeling and simulation of the mitral valve, one of the four valves in the human heart. The valve is composed of leaflets attached to a ring, the free edges of which are supported by a system of chordae, which themselves are anchored to muscles inside the heart. First, we examine valve anatomy and show the results of original dissections. These display the gross anatomy and information on fiber structure of the mitral valve. Next, we build a model valve following a design-based approach to elasticity. We incorporate information from the dissections to specify the fiber topology of this model. We assume the valve achieves mechanical equilibrium while supporting a static pressure load. The solution to the resulting differential equations determines the pressurized configuration of the valve model. To complete the model we then specify a constitutive law based on experimental stress-strain relations from the literature. Finally, using the immersed boundary method, we simulate the model valve in fluid in a computer test chamber. The aim of this work is to determine the basic principles and mechanisms underlying the anatomy and function of the mitral valve.

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Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Peskin, Charles S.
Commitee: Cerfon, Antoine, Griffith, Boyce, McQueen, David, Tabak, Esteban
School: New York University
Department: Mathematics
School Location: United States -- New York
Source: DAI-B 79/02(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Applied Mathematics
Keywords: Cardiovascular mechanics, Fluid-structure interaction, Heart-valve mechanics, Heart-valve modeling, Mitral valve
Publication Number: 10618342
ISBN: 9780355407525
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