Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Zika Virus: A Cross-Sectional Study of the Knowledge and Perceptions of Pregnant Women Attending the Mount Sinai Hospital Prenatal Clinic
by Okezue, Chidinma, M.P.H., Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, 2017, 35; 10637487
Abstract (Summary)

Introduction: Zika virus is the most recent infectious disease outbreak involving a global response. It is associated with congenital malformations such as microcephaly.

Objective: This cross-sectional study investigated the knowledge and perceptions about Zika among pregnant women attending the Mount Sinai Hospital Prenatal Clinic.

Method: We surveyed 131 pregnant women who were ≥ 18 years of age between April 17-May 18, 2017. Descriptive statistics were calculated for responses to each survey question and presented as frequencies with percentages. A 1-way frequency analysis was performed on the demographic characteristics and a Fisher’s exact test was applied to identify any association between the participants’ demographics and their knowledge of Zika.

Results: Most women (61.1%) did not know that there is no treatment for Zika and 58% did not know that there is no vaccine to prevent contracting the virus. 62.6% said it’s very unlikely that they would contract the virus during their pregnancy. 63.4% obtain Zika information from the television and 38.9% would prefer pamphlets/written materials for receiving additional information. Question 5, 13 and 15, had p-values >0.05 indicating that there are no associations between demographics and knowledge of Zika. However, questions 6, 7, 9, 12 and 14 had p-values <0.05 indicating an association between demographics and knowledge of Zika.

Conclusion: Pregnant women in our study had limited knowledge about Zika and did not perceive themselves at risk of contracting the virus. These results provide insight for ways to increase and improve public health messaging for pregnant women and the general public.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Rothenberg, Andrea
Commitee:
School: Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
Department: Public Health
School Location: United States -- New York
Source: MAI 57/01M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Public health
Keywords:
Publication Number: 10637487
ISBN: 978-0-355-36334-0
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