Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Parental Employment Status and Child Feeding Practices Among African American and Latina Adolescent Girls
by Bonilla, Erika, M.P.H., California State University, Long Beach, 2017, 49; 10606633
Abstract (Summary)

Obesity in the United States is the highest among children in families with an income-to-poverty ratio of 100% or less. Exploration of whether parents’ employment status contributes to children’s diets may clarify pathways through which socioeconomic status may impact childhood obesity. The present study is a cross-sectional secondary analysis utilizing the baseline data from the Transitions study; a longitudinal, biobehavioral study assessing changes in physical activity among Latina and African American girls. The secondary analysis assessed the relationship between parental employment status and child feeding practices, dietary behavior, and adiposity. One-way independent ANOVAs were conducted to compare child feeding practices, dietary intake, and adiposity by employment status. No significant findings were found; however, there was an indication that employment status likely influences children’s eating patterns and weight status. The association between parental employment status and childhood obesity is understudied, and the available results do not present a consistent relationship.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Nguyen-Rodriguez, Selena
Commitee: Galvez, Gino, Rascon, Mayra S.
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: Health Science
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 57/01M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Public health
Keywords: African american, Child feeding practices, Latino, Obesity, Parental employment, Socioeconomic status
Publication Number: 10606633
ISBN: 978-0-355-34188-1
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