Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Analyzing the Online Environment: How Are More Effective Teachers Spending Their Time?
by Barrentine, Scott Davis, M.S.T., Portland State University, 2017, 160; 10606359
Abstract (Summary)

Teaching at an online school is so different from classroom teaching that traditional training includes few of the skills necessary to be a successful online teacher. New teachers to an online environment face a steep learning curve in how they’ll use the instructional technology, prioritize their time, and establish relationships with their students. The literature has advice for these teachers about effective online practices, but there has been little research to establish which strategies are most effective in motivating students. This pre-experimental study, conducted at an online 6th-12th grade hybrid school, investigated the practices used more often by the most effective teachers. Teacher effectiveness was measured by the number of assignments their students had not completed on time. Recognizing that the effectiveness of different practices will vary from student to student, the research analysis included two covariates, measured by surveys: the academic identity and motivational resilience of the students, and the students’ self-reported preferences for motivational strategies. More effective teachers were found to make videos more frequently, both of the teacher for motivational purposes and recorded by the teacher to help students move through the curriculum. Quick grading turnaround and updating a blog were also more common with all effective teachers. Distinct differences between middle and high school students came out during data analysis, which then became a major point of study: according to the data, more effective middle school teachers emphasized individual contact with students, but the less effective high school teachers spent more time on individualized contact. The surveys used in this study could be modified and implemented at any online school to help teachers discover and then prioritize the most effective strategies for keeping students engaged.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Becker, William
Commitee: Sneider, Cary, Wagner, Stephanie
School: Portland State University
Department: General Arts and Letters
School Location: United States -- Oregon
Source: MAI 57/01M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Education, Educational technology, Science education
Keywords: Motivation, Online, Practices, Science, Strategies
Publication Number: 10606359
ISBN: 978-0-355-33910-9
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