Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The Links that Transition Ambition to Action: Analysis of African American Military Officers Transitioning from the Lower Class
by Hare, Louis C., III, M.A., Hawaii Pacific University, 2017, 203; 10607338
Abstract (Summary)

The Links that Transition Ambition to Action: Analysis of African American Military Officers Transitioning from the Lower Class Louis C. Hare III, B.S., M.A. M.A. Communication, Hawaii Pacific University, Department of Communication May 2017 Thesis Advisor: Dr. John Barnum The notion of “The American dream” can perhaps be described by one word: “opportunity.” This study identifies differentiating factors that affect someone’s ambition (motivation) as an adolescent and young adult, and what factors drive a person to seek and achieve their piece of the “American dream.” More importantly, the primary focus is to identify factors that offer an explanation as to why some people can rise from being raised in a state of poverty to eventually be flourishing members of society, while others (given comparable cultural, socioeconomic, religious, and educational backgrounds) have no such success. The results of this discussion allow for a juxtaposition of these factors, and also inform future efforts to bridge the gap between adolescent ambition and prosperity in America. This study gleans feedback primarily from African American United States Service Academy Graduates, of urban upbringing, ranging from recent college graduates to senior citizens and consists of a mixed-method approach.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Barnum, John M.
Commitee: Chuang, Lisa M., Fallis, Timothy W.
School: Hawaii Pacific University
Department: Communication
School Location: United States -- Hawaii
Source: MAI 57/01M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: African American Studies, Behavioral psychology, Communication
Keywords: Ambition, Motivation, Poverty, Prosperity, Socioeconomic, Success
Publication Number: 10607338
ISBN: 9780355319552
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