Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Operationalizing System Importance Measures for Assessing System of System Resilience
by Chandrahasa, Rakshit, M.S.A.A., Purdue University, 2017, 110; 10615733
Abstract (Summary)

In recent times, there has been a shift in focus from component level to system level analysis and an increasing effort to understand and design resilience into the system. Several efforts have been carried out in creating metrics to analyse resilience. Understanding and implementing system resilience in complex System of Systems will help us in building safer and resilient systems.

System Importance Measures (SIMs) was formulated to analyse System of System resilience and help in designing a resilient SoS. Here, we operationalize these System Importance Measures for designing a resilient SoS. We first look at the existing methodology to improve the visual representation of system resilience and its usability. We demonstrate this using our first case study with a Naval warfare SoS.

We incorporate probability into the SIM formulation. We expand the existing SIMs to quantify the effects of disruptions and mitigation likelihoods. We built a second case study based on Air transportation networks and demonstrated our expanded metrics in both the case studies.

SIM based analysis of SoS resilience provides us with two different analysis of resilience, with and without probability. Having an outlook on how the resilience changes with a probability of disruptions can aid the designer making informed choices on design changes and help in creating a resilient SoS.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Marais, Karen
Commitee: Davendralingam, Navindran, DeLaurentis, Daniel
School: Purdue University
Department: Aeronautics and Astronautics
School Location: United States -- Indiana
Source: MAI 57/01M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Aerospace engineering
Keywords: Operationalizing, Resilience, System importance measures
Publication Number: 10615733
ISBN: 978-0-355-26292-6
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