Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

A Case Study of 2-4 Transfer in New Jersey: Implementation of a Transfer Law at Three Community Colleges
by McCormick, Mark Allen, Ed.D., University of Pennsylvania, 2017, 153; 10600922
Abstract (Summary)

The purpose of this study was to examine ways in which the 2007 New Jersey transfer law mandating “seamless transfer” between public two- and four-year colleges has been implemented at three community colleges and the state’s flagship research university and the forces that have contributed to and limited the extent to which the law has achieved its expected goals. This single case study with three embedded units involved the analysis of interview data and public documents to address the research questions. The implementation of the law was examined through a combination of Sabatier’s Advocacy Coalition Framework and Matland’s Ambiguity-Conflict model.

This research revealed two themes associated with the implementation of the law: (1) areas of cooperation between community colleges and public senior institutions; and (2) areas of conflict between the two sectors. Findings of the research are as follows: (a) failure of Rutgers University New Brunswick to abide fully by the provisions of the law; (b) unwillingness on the part of senior institutions to accept in transfer courses with a technical focus included in A.A. or A.S. degrees awarded by the community colleges; and (c) lack of advisement for some students at community colleges.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Perna, Laura W.
Commitee: Finney, Joni E., Klein, Michael W.
School: University of Pennsylvania
Department: Higher Education
School Location: United States -- Pennsylvania
Source: DAI-A 79/01(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Community college education, Law, Higher education
Keywords: Articulation, Case study, Community college, Implementation, New Jersey, Transfer
Publication Number: 10600922
ISBN: 9780355219036
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