Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Pocket Monsters: The Potential Power of Pocket Films, and the Birth of Pocket Cinema
by James-Erickson, Luke Hunter, M.H., University of Colorado at Denver, 2017, 104; 10289396
Abstract (Summary)

This paper critically examines films created with smart phones and similar devices in order to discuss how these films are understood within modern society, and how they can potentially be used as a potent source of empathy or a destructive tool of manipulation. Since the tools of cinematic creation have become more widely available, thanks to the development of inexpensive cameras and smartphones, making films and viewing films made by other amateur filmmakers has become a part of many people’s everyday life, so much so that these films are rarely considered to be ‘films’ at all. In this thesis, I take six films shot on what I call “pocket cameras” and focus a critical eye on them, examining them as though they were ‘traditional’ films. It is the goal of this thesis to show that ‘pocket films’ have the depth and complexity of ‘traditional’ films, but because viewers do not consider them to be ‘films’, viewers thus having fewer protective ‘barriers’ between themselves and the pocket film’s messages, these pocket films’ methods of ideological dissemination are more effective than those of a ‘traditional’ film.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Hagelin, Sarah
Commitee: Silverman, Gillian, Woodhull, Margaret
School: University of Colorado at Denver
Department: Humanities
School Location: United States -- Colorado
Source: MAI 56/06M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Film studies
Keywords: Cinema, Film, Movies, Pocket cinema, Pocket films, Third cinema
Publication Number: 10289396
ISBN: 9780355199017
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