Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

500 Year Chenier, Architecture, Cultural Identity, and Land Change "Identification in a Dynamic Place"
by Rutherford, Kayla Brooke, M.A.R., University of Louisiana at Lafayette, 2017, 166; 10266106
Abstract (Summary)

This thesis explores how the architectural syntax of the Chenier Plain of coastal Louisiana expresses a culture entangled in a changing milieu. The architecture proposed in this thesis develops this syntax into alternative strategies of resiliency for the coast. Through this developed syntax, the architecture records memorializes and connects the culture of lower Cameron Parish to its changing landscape. Subsidence and Sea level rise are causing land loss and hurricanes are an annual threat to this location. The loss of the land is causing changes in the systems of orientation that we identify with limiting people’s capacity to “dwell” as defined by Heidegger: • The loss of identification • The loss of neighbor • The loss of soil to cherish.

The architecture in this thesis has been designed to respond to a 350 year flooding projection model. The architecture designed in this thesis marks the landscape when the landscape is no longer identifiable. It uses the cultural syntax of the Chenier Plain to inform resiliency. It will record culture throughout time and a changing landscape. This thesis creates a place for neighbors to reconnect, and it address the landscape with a synergistic relationship that allows for people to cultivate and cherish the land.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Latiolais, Ashlie
Commitee: DeRouen, JoAnne, McClure, Michael, Saft, Corey, Smith, Kari
School: University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Department: Architecture
School Location: United States -- Louisiana
Source: MAI 56/06M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Architecture
Keywords: Chenier, Chenier plain, Geodesign, Land change, Landmarking, Sea level rise
Publication Number: 10266106
ISBN: 9780355114126
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