Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

An Analysis of Church Leaders' Perceptions of Bullying: The Willingness and Capacity to Engage in an Anti-Bullying Initiative in a Rural Kentucky Community
by Kim, John, Ed.D., Northern Kentucky University, 2017, 164; 10266069
Abstract (Summary)

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the perception, beliefs, and attitudes of church leadership on issues of bullying. The focus on church leadership is important as the impact that adults in key leadership positions have on issues of bullying and other forms of interpersonal violence is better recognized today. The role of church leadership is especially important in small, rural communities where churches are often the centerpiece of worship and social bonding. Church leaders from a rural community of eastern Kentucky were assessed on their willingness and capacity to support and lead anti-bullying efforts as well as on their current and future roles in anti-bullying efforts. Through in-depth qualitative interviews, six key themes emerged, including the strong connection between bullying and Christian values, the lifelong physical and emotional impact of bullying, and the lack of current and future action despite a strong belief in personal capacity to make a difference in issues of bullying. The results of the research provided deeper understanding and insight into church leaderships’ perception of bullying as well as future implications for practice.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Tosolt, Brandelyn
Commitee: Jones, Jeff, Votruba, James
School: Northern Kentucky University
Department: Education Leadership
School Location: United States -- Kentucky
Source: DAI-A 78/12(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Social research, Educational leadership, Public health
Keywords: Anti-bullying, Bullying, Church and religion, Leadership, Perception, Rural communities
Publication Number: 10266069
ISBN: 9780355081732
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