Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Copper Phthalocyanine Crystal Growth Dependence on Gold Roughness
by Escobar, Erika, M.S., California State University, Long Beach, 2017, 59; 10265048
Abstract (Summary)

Phthalocyanine thin films play an important role in the design of various electronics including gas sensors and photovoltaic devices. In this thesis, the orientation of the copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecule on gold surfaces with different levels of roughness is investigated. Silicon substrates are coated with 8 nm of Cr followed by a layer of gold with thickness ranging from 2 nm to 75 nm. Additionally, CuPc is deposited at two temperatures, 100°C and 180°C, which affects the grain size and anneals the gold layer. Phthalocyanine can grow in the standing or lying configuration. X-ray diffraction in Bragg-Brentano configuration was used to analyze the crystal structure of the CuPc thin films. Results show the α-phase CuPc(200) peak at 6.8° 2&thetas; for most samples deposited at 100°C regardless of the gold thickness suggesting that the molecules are arranged in the standing configuration, where molecule- molecule interaction dominates the substrate-molecule interaction. On the other hand, for gold thicknesses of 17 nm, 37 nm and 75 nm deposited at 180°C, the 6.8° 2&thetas; peak is absent, and instead a higher peak at 27.7° 2&thetas; emerges, which likely corresponds to CuPc(112¯). This indicates that CuPc is in the lying configuration. Hence, CuPc thin films can take both lying and standing configurations on gold surfaces depending on the growth conditions.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Gredig, Thomas
Commitee: Bill, Andreas, Gu, Jiyeong
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: Physics and Astronomy
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 56/05M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Physics, Materials science
Keywords: Chromium, Copper phthalocyanine, Crystal, Gold, Roughness
Publication Number: 10265048
ISBN: 978-0-355-09467-1
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