Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The relationship between depression and coping among black and Latino men living with HIV/AIDS
by Ubiem, Cyril S., Ph.D., Northeastern University, 2010, 148; 3398176
Abstract (Summary)

African Americans and Latinos bear a disproportionate burden of health problems with respect to HIV/AIDS when compared to the general population. HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) is the virus that causes Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). This disease has been reported to be highest among the African American and Latino community in the United States. There are research studies on the relationship between HIV and depression as well as a growing interest in the coping patterns of people infected with HIV disease. In this study, African American and Latino men who are HIV-positive were recruited from two HIV agencies. The Concern and Coping with HIV and Beck Depression Inventory were administered to measure levels of coping and depression among the participants. According to the findings from multivariate analysis of Variance (MANOVA), there was no significant difference in the levels of depression or coping among African American and Latino HIV-positive men. Spearman bivariate correlation also indicated a significant relationship between depression and coping among African American and Latino HIV-positive men. There was no significant relationship between mode of HIV transmission and coping or mode of HIV transmission and depression. These results are discussed in terms of their clinical implications, highlighting the implication for policy, research, and practice.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Robinson-Wood, Tracy L.
Commitee: Chung, Barry Y., Sanchez, William
School: Northeastern University
Department: Counseling Psychology
School Location: United States -- Massachusetts
Source: DAI-B 71/04, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Mental health, Psychology, Clinical psychology
Keywords: African Americans, Coping, Depression, HIV/AIDS, Latinos
Publication Number: 3398176
ISBN: 9781109710724
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