Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Body Image and Sports Affiliation in School-Aged Boys
by Flynn, Kelly L., M.S., Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, 2017, 38; 10275646
Abstract (Summary)

Body image concerns have been considered predominantly female concerns in American society, yet rising levels of body image concerns have been reported for males in recent years. Weight class sports, such as wrestling, have been under public scrutiny for their pressure on participants to achieve certain weights and body types. However, very little research has actually been conducted on how sport participation affects body image in school-aged boys. The current study analyzed differences between sport group and reports of problematic eating behaviors and body image dissatisfaction. Participants were anonymously surveyed using Amazon Mechanical Turk services. After completing the survey, participants were separated into six groups based upon which sport that they most identified with, these groups included wrestling, cross country and track, baseball, soccer, basketball, and nonathletes. Results indicated that participation in some sports may lead to higher levels of body satisfaction, which is consistent with some previous research but refuted hypotheses. Results were also inconsistent with previous research, given that findings from the current study indicated that wrestlers and cross country and track runners may not be more likely to experience concerning eating habits and body dissatisfaction. Limitations to the current study and suggestions for future research are discussed.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Jewell, Jeremy D.
Commitee: Pawlow, Laura A., Shimizu, Mitsuru
School: Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville
Department: Psychology
School Location: United States -- Illinois
Source: MAI 56/05M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational psychology, Psychology
Keywords: Adolescent, Body-image, Male, Sport
Publication Number: 10275646
ISBN: 9780355059939
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