Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Using Music to Reverse Effects of Loneliness in Elders with Neurocognitive Disorders in Nursing Homes
by Lazowski, Victoria, M.S.W., Southern Connecticut State University, 2017, 32; 10271579
Abstract (Summary)

Elders suffering from neurocognitive disorders and reside in nursing homes are at higher risks for chronic loneliness (Ryder, 2016). Music interventions have been shown to help increase the overall well-being of elders while improving their quality of life and neuroplasticity in their brains (Compton & Hoffman, 2013). However, there is limited research on how elders living in nursing homes diagnosed with a neurocognitive disorder and suffering from loneliness respond to the use of music interventions as a component of hospice interventions. The purpose of this study was to explore the use of music interventions with cognitively impaired elders living in nursing homes and receiving hospice care. A purposive sample of two elders who resided in a nursing home was selected for this study. Data was collected using an observational log noting any changes in an elder’s behavior. At the conclusion of three sessions the findings showed that the participants had the most positive stimulation when their favorite music was played. The findings showed that the musical selections suggested by caregivers resulted in increased alertness, increased eye and foot movement and increased smiling with participants. It is hoped that the findings from this study will assist hospice social workers in utilizing music listening interventions with cognitively impaired elders living in nursing homes.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Gesino, Jack P.
Commitee:
School: Southern Connecticut State University
Department: Social Work
School Location: United States -- Connecticut
Source: MAI 56/05M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Social work
Keywords:
Publication Number: 10271579
ISBN: 9780355073454
Copyright © 2019 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest