Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Privileged Addicts Get Medical Treatment While Everyone Else Gets God: The Influence of Marginalization on Addiction Treatment
by Pace, Aiemie, M.A., Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, 2016, 60; 10276470
Abstract (Summary)

Addiction treatments have a very low rate of successful recovery in the U.S., consequently, treatment recidivism and substance abuse death are imminent. The purpose of this paper was to determine the relationship between marginalization and what type of treatment an individual received. This paper used a binary logistic regression to determine whether being a marginalized increases likelihood of receiving the lesser form of addiction treatment. The independent variable was split into 11 marginalization/privilege variables. The hypothesis for this paper were split into three models: 1) marginalization predicts an increase in an individuals likelihood of receiving Narcotic Anonymous treatment, 2) marginalization predicts an increase in the likelihood of receiving treatment in a Methadone maintenance facility, and 3) privilege predicts an increase in an individuals likelihood of receiving the inpatient treatment type. There are two variables that have a significant impact across all three models. Legality of income and status of felony record both impact the likelihood of receiving a certain treatment type. Thus, marginalization in the form of an illegal income or a felony record does increase an individual’s likelihood of receiving both Narcotics Anonymous as well as Methadone treatment types. Inversely, privilege increases an individual’s likelihood of receiving the inpatient treatment type. In conclusion, having illegal income and/or a felony record increases the likelihood of receiving the lesser treatment forms, while, having legal funds and no felony record increases the likelihood of receiving the better treatment option. This means that while privileged folks get treatment for their addictions marginalized folks remain a permanent addict in 12-step or die from a drug related illness.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Kauzlarich, David
Commitee: Cox, Kiana, Spurgas, Alyson
School: Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville
Department: Sociology
School Location: United States -- Illinois
Source: MAI 56/05M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Sociology
Keywords: Addiction, Addiction treatment, Marginalization, Privilige, Substance abuse, Substance use
Publication Number: 10276470
ISBN: 9780355051568
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