Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Examining the Role of Community Capacity for Sustainable Water Planning through Local Urban Governance: A Case Study Analysis of Waukesha, Wisconsin
by McCready, Molly, M.S., Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, 2017, 89; 10275135
Abstract (Summary)

Sprawling metropolitan areas within the United States are characterized by patterns of development that often outpace the resource management planning necessary to accommodate such growth. With no federal policy that exists to regulate for urban water management, the water infrastructure of growing communities are having to rapidly respond to demands for increased water availability and use. Environmental scholars assert that a transition into sustainable management is necessary, but requires citizen compliance that is promoted through collaborative governance. It is argued that barriers to implementing effective water management policy at the local level must lie within the functional institution of a given community. Data was collected from interviews with decision-makers and a community-wide survey in Waukesha, Wisconsin, a municipality faced with managing sprawl-induced water issues. Empirical statistical analyses were performed to discern the relationship between institutional predictors of community capacity and how factors of social learning, political self-efficacy, and modes of participation affect the community’s institutional ability to foster governance through community engagement. This research provides a more comprehensive understanding of the factors influencing the establishment of collaborative governance within a community, and thus their ability to build the capacity necessary to uphold implemented sustainable water policy.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Guehlstorf, Nicholas
Commitee: Daus, Catherine, Hanlon, James
School: Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville
Department: Environmental Sciences
School Location: United States -- Illinois
Source: MAI 56/05M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Environmental science
Keywords:
Publication Number: 10275135
ISBN: 9780355051391
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