Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

CLASP1 Regulated Endothelial Cell Branching Morphology and Directed Migration
by Myer, Nicole M., Ph.D., University of the Sciences in Philadelphia, 2016, 240; 10631484
Abstract (Summary)

The eukaryotic cytoskeleton is composed of varying proteinaceous filaments and is responsible for intracellular transport, cell proliferation, cell morphogenesis, and cell motility. Microtubules are one of three cytoskeletal components and have a unique polymer structure. The hollow cylinders undergo rapid polymerization and depolymerization events (i.e. dynamic instability) to promote assembly at the leading edge of the cell and disassembly in the rear of the cell to drive the cell front forward and facilitate directional migration. High-resolution light microscopy and automated tracking allow visualization and quantification of microtubule dynamics (i.e. growth speeds and growth lifetimes) during time-lapse imaging. These techniques were used to understand how the physical environment influences molecular control of endothelial cell morphology. The ultimate goal of this work is to test hypotheses relevant to vascular development and diseases associated with endothelial cell angiogenesis – defined as the development of new blood vessels from pre-existing vessels. Angiogenesis is of particular relevance because it is a commonality underlying many diseases affecting over one billion people worldwide, including all cancers, cardiovascular disease, blindness, arthritis, and Alzheimer's disease.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Myers, Kenneth A.
Commitee: Berget, Peter, Harvison, Peter, Janetopoulos, Christopher
School: University of the Sciences in Philadelphia
Department: Biological Sciences
School Location: United States -- Pennsylvania
Source: DAI-B 78/11(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Molecular biology, Cellular biology
Keywords: Angiogenesis, CLASP protein, Endothelial cell, Extracellular matrix, Migration
Publication Number: 10631484
ISBN: 9780355017069
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