Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Exploring Behavioral Intentions towards a Peer with Autism Spectrum Disorder
by Albright, Jordan, M.S., Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, 2017, 52; 10274773
Abstract (Summary)

Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) often face challenges integrating into social groups, making friends, and maintaining peer relationships. Few studies have been able to effectively address the shortcoming of anti-stigma, psychoeducational programs that target typically developing peers’ behavioral intentions towards students with ASD, which could help to enhance the possibility of social inclusion for these individuals. Objective: This study examined the effects that knowledge and understanding of a diagnosis have on peer behavioral intentions toward a target student with ASD. One hundred twenty-six college-aged students were randomly assigned to one of three conditions in which they viewed a video of a target student demonstrating symptoms of ASD. Conditions were distinguished based on the disclosure of information regarding the target student’s diagnosis and symptomatic behavior. Self-report data were then collected to determine the participants’ behavioral intentions toward the target student. Results indicated that disclosure of an ASD diagnosis and an explanation regarding the diagnosis did not significantly predict behavioral intentions towards the target student with ASD. Areas of improvement and suggestions for future research are discussed.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Hupp, Stephen
Commitee: Jewell, Jeremy, McKenney, Elizabeth
School: Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville
Department: Psychology
School Location: United States -- Illinois
Source: MAI 56/04M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Psychology, Clinical psychology
Keywords: Adolescents, Autism spectrum disorder, Behavioral intentions, Children, Peers, Stigma
Publication Number: 10274773
ISBN: 9781369837896
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