Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Work-Life Balanced Culture, Work Flexibility, and Inducements: Impact on Perceived Organizational Attractiveness and Job Pursuit Intention
by Bauer, Stephanie Lynn, M.A., Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, 2017, 82; 10270345
Abstract (Summary)

Despite the current interest in organizational attractiveness and job pursuit intention, little research has examined the impact that different forms of benefits have on these two factors. This study examines the additive effect that work-life balanced culture, work flexibility, and inducements has on organizational attractiveness and job pursuit intention. A total of 119 adults participated in this study. Participants were randomly assigned to view one of eight different job descriptions with varying benefits. Two questionnaires were completed on organizational attractiveness and job pursuit intention to determine how benefits were perceived by applicants. A single factor (8 level) MANOVA was used to examine the hypotheses. The results showed that work flexibility and inducements had a significant impact on perceived organizational attractiveness and job pursuit intention. There were no differences found between males and females when examining the size of the impact of work-life balanced culture, work flexibility, and inducements on organizational attractiveness and job pursuit intention. Correlations are also discussed.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Nadler, Joel
Commitee: Bartels, Lynn, Berkley, Robyn
School: Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville
Department: Psychology
School Location: United States -- Illinois
Source: MAI 56/04M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Psychology, Occupational psychology
Keywords: Inducements, Job pursuit intention, Organizational attractiveness, Work attitudes, Work flexibility, Work-life balanced culture
Publication Number: 10270345
ISBN: 978-1-369-85507-4
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