Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Client Preference: Does Simply Asking Make a Difference?
by Hess, Taylor, M.A., Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, 2017, 50; 10274726
Abstract (Summary)

Client preference is defined as “specific variables or attributes that clients desire to have in a therapy setting” (Thompkins, Swift, & Callahan, 2013, p. 279). The current study expands upon the literature regarding client preference and whether asking clients about their preferences will have a positive impact on their perceived therapeutic relationship and motivation for therapy. This study’s methodology randomly exposed participants to one of three conditions: no preference component, assessment of preferences, or assessment and validation that preferences would be met. It was hypothesized that participants who are assessed for their preferences would have higher therapeutic alliance and client motivation ratings than participants in the control condition (no preference exposure). It was also hypothesized that participants who are assessed and validated for their preferences would have higher therapeutic alliance and client motivation ratings than participants who were only assessed for their preferences. The results indicate that implementation of client preferences may be more important and influential than assessment of preferences alone.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Pomerantz, Andrew
Commitee: Dudley, Michael, Segrist, Dan
School: Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville
Department: Psychology
School Location: United States -- Illinois
Source: MAI 56/04M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Clinical psychology
Keywords: Client motivation, Client preference, Therapeutic alliance
Publication Number: 10274726
ISBN: 9781369817133
Copyright © 2019 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest