Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Re-envisioning the Piano Recital: An Audiovisual Alternative
by Muriago, Agustin, D.M.A., University of Hartford, 2017, 77; 10277387
Abstract (Summary)

Since its inception, the piano recital has remained the principal—if not exclusive—model for presenting solo piano repertoire. It is a format that, as this essay will examine, has evolved throughout its history in response to artistic, social, and technological changes. Therefore, to advocate for modifications in the piano recital is simply to continue the rich tradition of a format that has not been rigid, but responsive to its environment. One way to suggest an alternative is by rethinking the recital in an audiovisual way. Correspondences between acoustical and visual elements abound, both in theory and materialized in instruments to “perform” colors. Furthermore, the development of abstract animation allowed fundamental aspects of music to be effectively visualized: time, gesture, and form, to name a few. The moving image solidified the relationship between both modes and began our current multimedia era. Many genres of music have demonstrated the value of a visual component as a complement to a performance, something which has been increasingly capturing the attention of classical musicians. By analyzing the aesthetic implications of a multimedia recital and evaluating projects that explore the addition of a visual element, we can suggest an alternative format that preserves the traditional piano repertoire and re-contextualizes it in a way that might better resonate with modern audiences.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Nott, Kenneth
Commitee: Braus, Ira, Westfall, David
School: University of Hartford
Department: Music
School Location: United States -- Connecticut
Source: DAI-A 78/10(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Music, Performing Arts
Keywords: Audiovisual, Multimedia performance, Music visualization, Piano recital, Visual music
Publication Number: 10277387
ISBN: 9781369814071
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