Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

How Telecommuters Balance Work and Their Personal Lives
by Miller, Tina M., D.B.A., Baker College (Michigan), 2016, 206; 10265943
Abstract (Summary)

Past research has suggested that telecommuters can balance their work and personal lives more efficiently than their office counterparts. Researchers had not explored how telecommuters who worked for a private health insurer balanced their work and personal lives. The following aspects of telecommuting were investigated: (a) telecommuters’ expectations, (b) structure of work and home environment, and (c) handling obstacles at work and home. This qualitative phenomenological study consisted of interview data collected from a convenience sample of 19 full-time telecommuters self-selected from a population of 5,819 people who worked for a private health insurer located in the United States. The theoretical framework for the study was Herzberg’s two-factor theory and Maslow’s hierarchy of needs theory. Seven themes emerged: (a) maintaining a separate office in the home; (b) setting family expectations; (c) remaining task oriented and disciplined and maintaining a normal routine; (d) communicating with managers and colleagues; (e) juggling work and personal life; (f) taking breaks and lunches; and (g) taking personal time off. The results indicated that work–life balance can be achieved by (a) creating structure in the working environment, (b) gaining organizational and management support, (c) limiting personal obstacles during working hours, and (d) limiting work-related tasks during personal time.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Hoon, Stephanie
Commitee: Bojarczyk, Helen, Dereshiwsky, Mary
School: Baker College (Michigan)
Department: Center for Graduate Studies
School Location: United States -- Michigan
Source: DAI-A 78/09(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Business administration
Keywords: Balance, Family, Health insurance, Telecommute, Work/life
Publication Number: 10265943
ISBN: 9781369734874
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