Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Combat branding and the Islamic State: A missing link to generating a terrorist recruit profile
by Micuda, Kelley Marie, Ph.D., Fielding Graduate University, 2017, 138; 10258582
Abstract (Summary)

Profiling has its traditions in criminal investigations where it is used to assist in apprehending an offender by examining and attempting to understand his or her psychological motivations and personality. Terrorist specialists and theorists have applied traditional profiling techniques in hopes of distinguishing nonterrorists from terrorists and in an endeavor to understand the motivators for radicalization. However, these attempts have created a divide between the theorists resulting in contradictory data and debate. With the rise of social media, the methods of terrorism have changed. The Islamic State (IS) in particular has tapped into using media, not only to recruit, but as a form of technological combat, which in turn has added to their success and strength. This dissertation introduces the theory of Combat Branding. The findings of this dissertation suggest that it is possible to create a deductive profile of Western IS recruits by beginning with the examination of IS’s Combat Brand. This is a qualitative visual narrative study of official IS media consisting of video and still images. It is my hypothesis that starting with an analysis of the Combat Brand is a missing link to approaching a deductive profile of the intended target audience.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Hare, Garry P.
Commitee: Rutledge, Pamela, Seese, Gregory, Sewell, Daniel R.
School: Fielding Graduate University
Department: The School of Psychology
School Location: United States -- California
Source: DAI-B 78/08(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Behavioral psychology, Social psychology, Psychology
Keywords: Combat branding, Deductive profiling, Identity formation, Islamic state, Terrorism, Visual narrative study
Publication Number: 10258582
ISBN: 9781369627800
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