Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Elementary schools with high-achieving IREAD-3 scores: What they do differently
by Terhune, Charles L. Terry, Ph.D., Indiana State University, 2016, 182; 10249132
Abstract (Summary)

The ability to read is the foundational skill which is taught in elementary schools across the state of Indiana. It is a complex process which allows children to derive meaning from printed text. Reading is the basis for learning and growth to continue during a child’s educational life (Opitz & Rasinski, 1998). Over time throughout history, the ability to read is and has been the great equalizer for people (Ruddell, Ruddell, & Singer, 1994).

Reading has been taught and evaluated in many different ways (Groves, 2009). The state of Indiana has developed a standardized assessment to measure a child’s reading ability and comprehension skills at the end of third grade. This summative assessment is known as the Indiana Reading Evaluation and Determination or IREAD-3 (IDOE IREAD-3, n.d.). The assessment is based on Indiana Academic Standards to measure the foundational reading skills a child has developed by the end of third grade. It is used to determine promotion to fourth grade or retention in third grade (Title 511 Indiana State Board of Education, 2011).

A mixed method study was conducted to determine if relationships existed between the predictor variables of vocabulary, fluency, comprehension, and teacher pedagogy and the criterion variable of passing percentage rates on the IREAD-3 assessment. In the quantitative survey, two null hypotheses were tested. The first null determined if the composite scores for vocabulary, fluency, comprehension, and classroom pedagogy of elementary primary literacy teachers predict a statistically significant proportion of the variance on the IREAD-3 pass rate among schools of affluence. The second null determined if the composite scores for vocabulary, fluency, comprehension, and classroom pedagogy of elementary primary literacy teachers predict a statistically significant proportion of the variance on the IREAD-3 pass rate among schools of poverty. A multiple linear regression was utilized to examine both hypotheses. The results of the regression analysis found that a linear combination of predictor variables did not explain a statistically significant amount of variance with IREAD-3 passing rate percentages for schools of affluence or schools of poverty. Therefore, the null hypotheses were retained.

The second part of the mixed method study focused on qualitative case study interviews with three building level principals and one teacher. During the interviews, five themes developed after the field notes and interview transcripts were coded and analyzed. The common themes which emerged were:

1. Teachers have time during the school day to meet together to collaborate, plan, and discuss literacy skill development of their children. 2. Schools promote and embrace parents and volunteers as essential components which are included in the learning process during the school day. 3. Teachers voluntarily spend time after school to tutor students on a school-wide basis. 4. Learning is intentionally broken down into small groups based on reading level or ability. 5. Schools have a support network in place and literacy professionals to assist classroom teachers in teaching children to learn to read based on the use of data.

Several implications for teachers, principals, and district administrators were discussed as a result of the findings and conclusions. Finally, recommendations for further research were proposed.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Balch, Bradley V.
Commitee: Kiger, Susan J., McDaniel, Terry P.
School: Indiana State University
Department: Educational Leadership, Administration, and Foundations
School Location: United States -- Indiana
Source: DAI-A 78/07(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational leadership, Elementary education, Literacy, Reading instruction
Keywords: Comprehension, IREAD-3, Literacy, Primary instruction, Standardized assessment
Publication Number: 10249132
ISBN: 9781369443653
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