Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Help-seeking behavior and religious commitment
by Exman, Amanda, Psy.D., Saint Mary's University of Minnesota, 2016, 47; 10195031
Abstract (Summary)

The current study examined the attitudes and intended behavior of college students toward seeking help on campus for various hypothetical psychological and physical concerns. Participants (n = 84) were undergraduate students at a Bethel University, a Midwestern Evangelical Christian university who completed three measures: (a) a scale examining intention to seek help from various sources; (b) the Religious Commitment Inventory (RCI-10); and (c) the Attitudes Towards Seeking Professional Help Scale (ATSPHS). Results showed a majority of students prefer to seek help from their friends and family members. Their willingness to seek help from professional sources was lower than anticipated based on previous studies with similar populations while their religious commitment levels were consistent with other religious college student populations. The results suggest students at this university are unlikely to see a need to seek professional help, but when they do, they will choose appropriate resources on campus. These results may help college counseling centers to orient students to resources on campus, which are appropriate for their concerns. The study confirmed previous research suggesting that college students have a preference for seeking help from friends and family as opposed to professional resources.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Solberg, Kenneth
Commitee: Holland, Daniel, John, Andrew
School: Saint Mary's University of Minnesota
Department: Counseling Psychology
School Location: United States -- Minnesota
Source: DAI-B 78/07(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Counseling Psychology
Keywords: Attitudes toward seeking professional help scale, Help-seeking, Religious commitment, Religious commitment inventory, Undergraduate students
Publication Number: 10195031
ISBN: 9781369508420
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