Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Gender Roles, Alexithymia, Stigma, and Men's Attitudes Towards Help-Seeking for Depression
by Abrams, Gwyneth, M.A., Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, 2016, 63; 10249972
Abstract (Summary)

Alexithymia, masculine gender roles, public stigma, and attitudes toward help seeking for depression were examined in relation to men’s willingness of seeking help for depression. Adult male participants (N= 190) recruited online (Amazon’s Mechanical Turk) completed Normative Male Alexithymia Scale (NMAS), Male Role Norms Inventory (MRNI-SF), Perceptions of Stigmatization by Others for Seeking Psychological Help (PSOSH), Attitudes Toward Seeking Professional Psychological Help scales (ATSPPH-SF), and questions based on a vignette indicating level of willingness of seeking help for depression. Scores were analyzed to predict the likelihood of seeking help for depression among men. Data were analyzed using regression analysis. Results indicate that a greater likelihood of seeking help for depression was associated with more positive attitudes toward seeking professional psychological help, a decreased identification with male role norms, and with decreased alexithymia. Three of the predictors (NMAS, MRNI-SF, ATSPPH-SF) explained 49% of the variance, (3,167) = 52.573, p < .000, R 2 = .486. ATSPPH was the strongest predictor of men’s willingness of seeking help for depression. Limitations of this study and implications for practice and research are discussed.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Segrist, Dan J.
Commitee: Pawlow, Laura A., Pomerantz, Andrew M.
School: Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville
Department: Psychology
School Location: United States -- Illinois
Source: MAI 56/03M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Counseling Psychology, Clinical psychology, Gender studies
Keywords: Alexithymia, Depression, Gender roles, Help-seeking, Men
Publication Number: 10249972
ISBN: 9781369505931
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